Twitter To Blog Automatic Posting – Making Your Blog A Content Timeline

www.PaulColligan.com You can post directly to your Blog from Twitter (when it makes sense) through IFTTT.com. This method for automatic posting from Twitter makes it possible for your blog to become not just a repository for your posts, but a content timeline for the social content you wish it to store on your own terms. For fun, we also show you how to Tweet (and post to your WordPress Blog accordingly) from Siri. http

YouTube Is Social – Social Media Strategies And Tips For YouTube

www.PaulColligan.com Most people forget that YouTube is Social – that YouTube is a Social Network. In this short video, Paul Colligan explains all of the social elements of the new YouTube and how it should affect your YouTube Marketing Strategy. Yes, the new YouTube is tightly integrated with Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus (Google+) and more. Learn why YouTube is Social today. http

Using Twitter To Look Important?

So, as per a post at Facebook, I’ve done the “Twitter bankruptcy” thing. Was planning on a blog post re my reasons after I learned some of the implications. Round 1 comes a bit early (and I explain why):

I originally set my Twitter account to follow anyone who followed me. Reason why (we’ll discuss if smart move a bit later here) was simple: the general teaching on Twitter says it’s polite to follow anyone who follows you. Whether or not I agreed with the concept, if someone’s first impression of me was that I was being rude, what chance do I have? As a result, I followed back everyone (automatically).

Now, when you have 18,000 followers (yes, my numbers have gone done, more on that later) there is simply no way you can track read it all. No matter what social media strategies you have, it’s just a numbers issue.

So, I had an account that was simply designed (with automation) to keep people “happy.”

How did I “track” Twitter? Easy, I set up a phantom account of people I really wanted to track and then I set up several tracking feeds and get automatically updated whenever the terms I’m interested are mention in Twitter – whether I’m “following” the person or not.

Why the move? What I was doing wasn’t really doing anyone any good. Clicks from the Twitter feed were pathetically low (percentage wise at least – many many times as many clicks from my 2,200 Facebook Fans) and it simply wan’t painting a ‘real’ picture of what was going on online. In addition, there are some fascinating SEO implications of a realistic Twitter following that I wanted to explore. Also, I want to take my Twitter stream a little more seriously and I want to get a real accurate understanding of what’s going on.

What I’ve learned so far? Unfollowing everyone wasn’t as easy as I thought it was going to be. In addition, when I started – 17,968 were following me and the number is currently down to 16,952. There is no way 1000 people in the last few days have gone through this stuff by hand. What we have here is a lot of people running the popular “unfollow anyone who doesn’t follow me” scripts. That isn’t about communication is it?

Anybody want to guess what the “robots” are going to do to my follower account in the next months? Should I care at all?

ALSO LEARNED – Not all Twitter tracking is created equal. That quote from the graphic above wasn’t picked up by either MarketMetSuite, HootSuite or Search.Twitter.com (yes, I use all of those and more – I’m very serious about Twitter). I caught it from, of all things, the iPhone App Boxcar. This morning, it was retweeted by @TonyMackGD and that was picked up accordingly. Was planning on writing this in a few days but once the retweet happened, it was time to deal.

Smart move? Time will tell. As you can tell from the graphic above, some people are thinking I’m making the wrong move. That’s ok, it wouldn’t be the first time.

What am I doing next? I’m actually intending on doing a lot more with Twitter now that I have a “real” account. I want to do a lot of content curating and real tracking of a real audience.

We’re less than a week into this grand experiment and I certainly will share more of what I’ve learned along the way but that’s why I’m doing what I’m doing.

So, did I make the “right” move? I’d love your thoughts below.

Another Twitter Done Poorly Story – Bad Verizon FIOS

Several of you have asked why I left Verizon FIOS. Isn’t fiber to your house the greatest thing since sliced bread?

Well, in short, FIOS left me. You can read the article here. Service has gone down tremendously and there is really nobody to call about it. What a mess.

Last Friday, after waiting in line 45 minutes at the local Verizon store to be told that they not only can’t help me cancel FIOS, but aren’t even really sure where to send me (yes, they said the Kiosk at the local mall “might work.”) I decided to send out a Tweet asking how to cancel.

That was over 72 hours ago.

They just tweeted back … “Is there anything we can do to help you out?”

You see, not only did they take three days to respond, but … it’s obvious they didn’t even read the Tweet.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – “You need to train in Customer Service 101 before you train in New Media 202.

Why does this have to be so hard?

Five Essential Elements To Every Online Strategy

Online is “different” in a Web 2.0 world. A few years ago, we’d speak of necessities in terms of technologies and tools.

It’s time to kill that approach. It’s now all about these elements – the tech simply doesn’t matter.

I’m going to suggest that everyone looking to market and publish online needs stop thinking about WordPress and Facebook and YouTube and Podcasting and the like – but think FIRST about these 5 elements and how they can use whatever technology they want to make sure they’ve leveraged these issues. It’s a subtle difference but can have a powerful impact on your place in this space:

Syndication. The Internet is now received on your audience’s terms. This is powered by syndication. Yes, RSS is part of this, but it is by no means the only (or most important) tech behind this element. I’d drop RSS in a minute for the syndicated social stream made possible by Twitter, Facebook or YouTube.

I can hear the geeks screaming now (I hear them because I am one), “but RSS powers all that stuff.” First of all, it doesn’t anymore and secondly, it doesn’t “matter” at all. It ain’t RSS that lets my audience watch my latest YouTube Video on their way home from work (after being notified that it’s live) and I’d bet you 90% of my audience who reads via RSS doesn’t even know that she’s the tech behind the scenes.

In short, 1) If EVERYTHING YOU PRODUCE ain’t syndicated, you are wasting your time. 2) If you think it’s about RSS, you’ve missed the point.

Interactivity. You must allow your audience to interact with your content much the same way that television must broadcast in color. It is simply expected and you basically look silly if you don’t provide it. There are tools that make it more robust and there are dozens of strategies on what to do with the interactivity but you must have it, period.

By the way, please comment below on what you think of this idea.

Microbursting. As I type this Blog post, I have to face two simple facts. The first one is that some of my audience will never read this blog by default (regardless of bookmarking or syndication). They need a reason to do so. These are people who make decisions based on the microburst. Microbursts (today) include Twitter, Facebook updates, status alerts, etc. But, and make sure you get this, whereas the tech might change tomorrow, the need to microburst ain’t going away. You need a microburst strategy more than you need a Twitter client.

When I publish this post, I will microburst everywhere that makes sense that this article is live, and I’ll see as many readers from the microburst as from anything else. This is, of course, automated – but that is another Blog post all together.

Multimedia. The second fact I must face is that the written word of a Blog like this only hits a certain segment of my audience. Like some respond to the microburst, some respond to audio and visual media. This isn’t me reading this Blog post into a slideshow and posting at YouTube, this is me asking myself how I can reach and audience best reached through audio and video (text ain’t enough).

Destination Strategies. You gotta go where people are. As cool as it is to think that everyone wants to visit our Websites and Blogs on a regular basis, we need to identify where they are and be there too. As I write this, a destination strategy demands a Facebook Fan Page and a YouTube User Page (even if you have no videos) but this could change at any point. In short, know where your audience is, and be there too.

One of the most freeing effects of this approach is that it moves content producers from having to master a tech to having to master communicating with their audience. Imagine how much better things will get for all of us once we’ve all made that move.

My 2010 New Media Predictions

Beware a prognosticator who isn’t honest about past prognostication. How did I do with my 2009 predictions? I’m calling 4 out of 5.

    2009 Prediction #1 – Now that iPod finally has a competitor in the Zune, you’ll see advances this year in new media aggregation that can only come from stiff competition. Was wrong there, but I’d like to say this … iPod doesn’t yet have a competitor in the Zune. Technically, it’s a great device with a great infrastructure, but until Microsoft figures out the marketing and positioning, it’s is going to remain a great device that nobody knows about. And, until everyone “knows” about it, this prediction can’t come to pass.

    2009 Prediction #2 – The meme that “nobody will pay for content” will quietly die. Check. We’ve got multiple 6-figure Podcasts in Premiumcast.com. Hulu is trying the trial balloon of charging for content. Apple ads monthly subscriptions to the iPhone App Infrastructure. Is the concept “dead” yet – not quite – but she’s on life support.

    2009 Prediction #3 – “Cable cutting” will become cool. The New York Times is reporting on it. The Boxee Box is coming (quicker than I thought it would). As per my last post, YouTube wants to bring television to your television. Roku has an $80 option. Nuff said.

    2009 Prediction #4 – The general public will stop treating microblogging (Twitter) as a 24×7 chat room and find some very strong business uses for it. The biggest pleasant surprises of the year for me have included the incredible CoTweet.com web client and the book Socialnomics (Erik Qualman, author of the book, joined us on the most recent episode of Internet Marketing This Week). CoTweet is a management system for Twitter that makes her a darn effective crm system and Socialnomics will prove to you that this is all much more than what “the kids” are doing.

    2009 Prediction # 5- There will be no real competitor to the iPhone in 2009. Nuff said.

So, now, predictions for 2010 …

    There will be no real competitor to the iPhone in 2010. There are a number of reasons for this. The 2 biggest are the fact that Apple will make some big announcements next year (including iPhone on other networks and the tablet). These moves will get the press that any iPhone “competitor” can only dream of. The issue is that no phone company yet “gets” what makes the iPhone great. How stupid is AT&T to let this slip away from them?

    “App Stores” will become the goto model for everyone. App Stores are easy, sexy, and considered by many to be a “proven” model because of the success of the iPhone. The “proven” part is examined in a later prediction. All the phones are doing it, and we’ll be seeing it inside of other systems – ebook readers, OSs, cable systems, any connected device.

    We’ll see some desperate last gasps for relevancy from the cable companies. They are scared to death because the only thing that people really want from them – they no longer have a monopoly on. They will, out of fear, try to create monopolies – because this is all they know. It won’t work. It’s gonna be ugly. This one might take longer than 2010 – but we’ll see the rumblings of it this year. NBComcast anyone?

    Hulu 1/1/2010 will be dramatically different than Hulu 12/31/2010. And by dramatically different I mean way less free stuff (or way more commercials). I’ve said from day one that she ain’t sustainable and the “big media” companies aren’t going to stand for it much longer.

    The “App Economy” and easy distribution and product creation models will flood the economy with a bunch of great stuff at prices that can’t sustain businesses. It’s gonna be messy. I’m not looking forward to this one at all – but it is inevitable. The app economy has created a world where 99 cents is standard and anything over that is eyed with suspicion. Not good. The press continues to propagate the meme. Also not good. This can only bring more crap barely worth 99 cents and tech and content companies selling at a reduced rate hoping to make up for it in volume. Niche is not a volume game. It’s going to be ugly. Please don’t fall victim to this one – people will pay well for the right content, services, and software.

So, I leave the comments open hoping to hear/read what you think. #5 is the one that I think will impact us the most – but all are important issues.

The 21st Century In 20th Century Terms

I’ve recently been a bit obsessed by the book Socialnomics (affiliate link). Lynn Terry introduced it to me last time we recorded Internet Marketing This Week and, wow, very very cool stuff. I can’t recommend it enough. I’m changing some things around here based on the simple truths contained within – and I’ll be you do the same if you pick it up. P.s., there is something very right about reading this one on your Kindle.

(BTW – @Equalman (the author) has agreed to come on a taping of the show soon and I promise to update you when he does.)

One of the big themes in the book is the fact that social media is changing “the way we live and do business.

Paul, that’s a bit extreme

If Twitter and Facebook were just some program, I’d agree. They’re not programs, they’re, for lack of a better term, operating systems, that let us do things we were never able to do before. It’s not what Twitter or Facebook does – it’s what we do with Twitter or Facebook that really matter.

Let’s look at some examples of this in history … the Web changed the very way we consumed content on the computer (it was never about the browser), email changed the way we communicated with each other (it was never about Outlook or Eudora), the cell phone changed the way people got a hold of us (it was never about the device that made it possible), and the list goes on (feel free to add some examples below) …

The last time I flew cross-country I was watching CNN on the plane for the 4 hours I was in the air. The big story of the moment was that Twitter was down. Yup, we’re at war, the economy is in some very sticky places, banks are failing and the big story of the day was … Twitter was down.

The skeptic watching the story would note that Twitter isn’t even in the top ten websites (at the time I write this, Alexa rates her at number 15).

It’s not about the site. It’s never been about the site.

Twitter “happens” via web, via sms, via desktop, via cell phone, via assistant, via email, via gaming console and more. Twitter is more than just a program. Her being down was at least as newsworthy as anything else CNN had to offer.

When I made my Facebook changes earlier this year, I never thought I’d enjoy the results the way I have been. What I thought was just a simple house-cleaning project has let me communicate better not just with my audience, but with my friends and family as well. How do I use Facebook? I Facebook via web, via sms, via desktop, via cell phone, via assistant, via email, via gaming console and more. Facebook is more than just a program – it’s a communications platform for me.

The people who “get” Twitter and Facebook are the ones who realize they are “more than just a program.”

This, of course, made me wonder if there are other examples of terms limiting the impact of the technologies we’re embracing like crazy. I came up with a few …

Podcasting is so much more than a program made by Apple – but to this day, my Mom still thinks she can’t consume Podcasts because her and Dad don’t have an Apple.

8 out of every 9 people who read www.PaulColligan.com content don’t read it at www.PaulColligan.com – yet most people think of a Blog as a really easy means to put content online – not an engine to syndicate your content to an exponentially bigger audience. I’ve got EXACTLY the platform I want in my Blog – it hasn’t never been about not having to do HTML.

Despite the reality that the iPhone is an amazing device, it has changed the cell phone and applications industry forever and that will impact the future of content delivery 100 fold compared to how it has changed the device we use to talk to Mom on.

Coming a little closer to home, I’m about ready to strangle the next person who limits our Premiumcast engine to be nothing more than “a way to charge for Podcasts” or says “video is better than audio” without examining audience and delivery.

I think this issue is a simple one: we’re trying to come to terms with the 21st century in terms we coined when gas passing a buck a gallon was “too much” and the Russians were the bad guys secretly hoping to kill us all. It’s akin to trying to describe the Star Wars films in Egyptian hieroglyphics or attempting to mime the social ramifications of Paris Hilton.

We need to start developing 21st century terms for these important issues.

Any idea how to start?

Or am I nuts?

UberSyndicator – Publish To Dozens Of Social Media Sites Without Getting Distracted

www.ubersyndicator.com Paul Colligan demonstrates his UberSyndicator product – which allows the publishing of content to dozens of social media sites without the need to log into each and get distracted accordingly. This one-way communication option lets you syndicate without getting distracted.