Google TV – What It Could Mean

I finally got my mind around Google TV and what it “means.”

And it is big.

First of all, it is real competition in the “Internet video on your television” space. With Apple TV admitting being nothing but a hobby and everyone else caring about their efforts with the same passion BP seems to care about plugging the leak, it’s easy to see why we’re getting nowhere in this space. I’ve written previously about the Roku box and Boxee’s plans but what really has happened in the last 6 months, year?

With Google taking this space seriously, we’re finally going to see some passion and growth past what we’re seeing right now. And, with their war chest, this nonsense with Hulu blocking Boxee type situations will be met with a legal war chest that can make things happen. Competition is a very good thing.

But, more importantly, we’ve got another issue at play that is even more vital.

Google in this space represents a true convergence box. This is the “old and new media playing together” dream we’ve had for years but have never seen delivered. I have in my basement plenty of boxes that put obscure Internet video on my screen and I have owned / seen / been briefed on / and have beta tested an equal amount of boxes that place nice with “old media” over the intertubes. The Xbox doesn’t do YouTube (let alone a decent Podcast option) and the Apple TV is as walled as a walled garden can get (even to the point of making it too weak to stream Flash well). When we talk about Tivo or traditional cable boxes, I just have to shudder. fILS and Twitter – silly – nothing else.

Boxee is the best hope in the underdog category (and I applaud Avner’s statements that they can work in a Google TV world) but even their approach to stuff puts a line between the two worlds. A new episode of Burn Notice goes right into my queue but the latest episode of The Totally Rad show does not. It’s just not “all coming together” the way it is supposed to … Yet. Roku is nice for what it does but the channels that aren’t there don’t appear to be coming.

At CES this year I got really nervous watching boxes from the “big names” designed (I believe purposely) to squash out the new media space. Sure, they were still lousy, but they were the only element seeing growth. And they might grow into something acceptable before we get our butts in gear.

Google TV can change this. The commercials speak of a world where the Web and Desperate Housewives can live in peaceful harmony and I’m betting my future that the box that let’s them is the box I want to get behind. Google has the war chest and moxie this space needs.

And they have my full support.

Do they have yours?

Oh yeah, their ownership of YouTube is key too :-).

Is Your Next Book An App?

I’ve been saying for a few years now that the real definition of Web 2.0 is “your content on your customer’s terms.” Everything really comes down to that as far as I’m concerned.

Techcrunch recently published a piece that says that authors need to publish their “next book” as an App (instead of an iBook). Great read – do it now.

While I like the concept, I’m not sure if that’s the direction. Perhaps the article should have asked if your next book should also be released as an App.

Yes, our content on your customer’s terms means a book isn’t enough.

But just an app isn’t enough either.

Your stuff needs to be available on a dead tree edition, an instant streaming edition, a phone edition, a pad edition, a plastic disk edition, an audio edition, a video edition, etc.

If you’ve watched the whole Vook thing, you might be thinking it’s the future. I’m calling it a gimmick. Show me any real content ONLY available on the VOOK format and I’ll change my mind.

So, content creators, I’m gonna suggest this simple fact: your future requires that you create your content on as many formats and platforms as possible.

Your thoughts?

Weekend Roundup: What Happened To Monday?

Yes, missed blog and Podcasts this week. Too into the Operation iPad Project. Back to normal next week, but here are some links to keep you warm and informed:

  • Songs Of Love is a great organization that puts some new media creators in a position of great service. Read what Geoff Smith is doing with them.
  • Jim Louderback wrote a piece called I support Web TV and I vote that is a must read.
  • Podcast Secret’s Student and cool guy Fred Castaneda has an episode of (one of his) most excellent podcasts about the iPad as a business tool.

Have a great weekend. My youngest turns 7 this weekend.

Is RSS Dead?

After listening to (o.k., watching), the fabulous TWiT #228 on my Roku over the break, I’ve decided to test a few things here at Colligan.com. There was some discussion about the relevancy of RSS and content subscriptions, etc. that I need to look into.

You’ll need to bear with me for the next few weeks and help me in this test. I’ll need you to click through to read the rest (please do if you’re interested in this topic).

Web 1.0 Versus Web 2.0

Web 1.0 was on your terms. Web 2.0 is on the terms of your customer.

Web 1.0 was about packaging. Web 2.0 is about delivery.

Web 1.0 was on the Web. Web 2.0 is on the device of your choice.

Web 1.0 was about surf and search. Web 2.0 is about subscribe.

Web 1.0 was about domain names. Web 2.0 is about RSS feeds.

Web 1.0 was about presentation. Web 2.0 is about dialogue.

Web 1.0 was a specific moment in time. Web 2.0 is whenever you want it to be.

Web 1.0 was about ownership. Web 2.0 is about mindshare.

Web 1.0 was about eyeballs. Web 2.0 is about attention.

Web 1.0 was about power. Web 2.0 is about potential.

Anything I should add to this list?