Dead In 2010

I tweeted last week that “Acer Chairman says iPad impact not serious … then offers Easter Bunny job as Chief Strategy Director.” Apologies to the Easter Bunny in suggesting he’d take such a demotion but, … let’s face it, with the iPad, the Netbook is dead in 2010.

Today I sit in front of my new MacBook Air typing this in – and I realized something. She’s got no CD/DVD drive, no drives at all. The spinning disk is dead in 2010.

With announcements of “App Store” for Windows, Mac, Windows Phone 7 and more, I felt a bit sad as I put my iLife 11 DVD in my iMac (the Air came with it preloaded (w a USB Restore Key). I’ll never do that again. Shrinkwrap software distribution is dead in 2010.

This morning I sat on the exercise bike and chose from more shows than I could possibly want on my iPad through Hulu Plus and Netflix (delivered over ATT 3G none the less). I love the new show “The Good Guys” but couldn’t even tell you what night it is on (and I remain a TV junkie). Sure, I canceled Cable TV in 2007 but the family simply doesn’t miss it anymore. Yes, Comcast delivers the Webernet to my home but I got Clear and Verizon as options too. No, everybody doesn’t have as many choices, but we do have choices. The Cable Company as monopoly is dead in 2010.

Cali Lewis is at Revision3 and even Adam Curry has taken a “soft exit” from the company formally known as Podshow. Mevio, the company who first sold Podcasters of the dream of quitting the day job, is dead in 2010.

What else is dead in 2010?

What are you going to change in 2011 as a result?

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • http://www.guerreroink.com Guerrero Ink

    I'm not sure but I can say that since a lot of the industry I work with is not on board with many of the Internet and computer changes, I keep external drives on hand so I can still access disks, zip drives (remember those?), and other such things.

    The big shift I see is the trend to mobile and I am a bit behind–next year might be super big for that and it will be interesting to see how things change up by this time next year!

  • http://twitter.com/Ols_Hill Ola Hill

    I don't know but I think it's safe to say that seeing as we saw Blockbuster file for chapter 19 bankruptcy in 2010, that not only is Blockbuster dead but all other brick n mortar video rentals are dead in 2010. Thanks to Netflix and other internet video rentals as well as TV on-demand services like Hulu.

  • Dan

    My dead short list includes….
    MySpace
    iPod Classic
    Multi-speaker 'pitchfest' seminars (folks have put away the credit cards and/or can't use their home equity as ATMs anymore)
    Cell phone etiquette (it's rare nowadays that I go into a Starbucks or restaurant and do not see/hear multiple people chatting up a storm)

  • paulcolligan

    i do have my drobo. are external disks dead, or just a lot bigger?

  • paulcolligan

    Don't forget Redbox. Yeah, Brick and Mortar rentals are dead in 2010.

  • paulcolligan

    I saw an iPod Classic in the Apple Store this weekend – but yeah, people don't love 'em like they used to – and they do seem soooooooo 2008.

  • http://paulgillespie.me Paul Gillespie

    I'd say “plausible deniability” is dead, but I've said that pretty much every year for the last five and it doesn't seem to die. But at some point tech has to have caught up with us to the point we can no longer claim we weren't aware of __________.

  • paulcolligan

    :-)

  • http://twitter.com/AndrewNez Andrew Nesbitt

    While I think it's been dead for a while now, the cassette Walkman is now officially dead.
    http://www.news.com.au/technology/sony-pulls-plug-on-cassette-players/story-e6frfro0-1225943082902

    And if I'm being clever, I think our privacy is now dead. We have so much of our lives online/stored now, either put there by us or by others/govt/companies, that we must be kidding ourselves if we think otherwise.

    Nez

  • http://www.classicmoviepostersblog.com Classicmoviepostersblog

    I'd have to go with DVD player and home telephones, although they have probably been gooone for a while now..

  • Albertwalkingstick-offers

    internet gurus

  • Ciprian IVAS

    Well Paul,
    I think you are in a hurry a bit. I thought things exactly like you and this year I sold my perfect laptop with a spinning unit and got a new powerful smaller lighter netbook without it. And after 2 weeks I had to recognise that I was wrong and I had to buy quick an external spinning unit.
    There is stil a lot of information on DVDs. Thats on one hand.
    But the most important thing is that you simply cannot put all your life in the cloud. And after testing a lot of external memories like HDDs, SSDs, sticks and cards…..I realised that the most reliable (not to talk about price) way for storage remains the old pal DVD.
    Dead….but maybe in 2011…..maybe later…… :)
    What else is dead in 2010?……officially just the Sony Cassette Walkman. And some of us of course. :)

  • http://twitter.com/DaveJackson David Jackson

    Can you elaborate on “Mevio, the company who first sold Podcasters of the dream of quitting the day job, is dead in 2010″ as I have many episodes on their servers, and still receive checks from them. I understand they changed their name, but dead?

  • paulcolligan

    I think, that if we don't think, our privacy is dead. But, if we do think as we do this stuff online, we can be ok.

  • paulcolligan

    Yeah.

  • paulcolligan

    Not gonna go there.

  • paulcolligan

    No future in it equals dead for me. But I do get your point.

  • paulcolligan

    Have you quit your day job? Did they go public? Did those shares that were gonna make Podcasters rich ever come to anything? They're an ad broker now – and not a very big one. Hardly the force they were originally positioned to be. There are a few Blockbuster stores too 😉

  • http://www.facebook.com/brucetownsenduk Bruce Townsend

    Dumb phones
    Foursquare (thanks to Facebook Places)
    The economy

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_54GRWVUAABI6XVSEAOEFFTEK54 Elsa

    I remember my green screen computer, my first no windows laptop (a total marvel at that time!). In fact I remember there being no computers, and even copy machines copying with black and white reversed. And we lined up to use them!

    I sit typing this on my 17-inch mac book pro – which will be the next to go – reading your entry on even more going the way of the dodo bird.

  • paulcolligan

    My favorite list yet. How do we respond?

  • paulcolligan

    Oh yeah …

  • Bob

    I beg to disagree that the netbook is dead.

    I can do more with a netbook than I can with an iPad.

    The only thing I plan on doing different in 2011 is to find more ways to market my business.

  • http://www.facebook.com/charles.h.hartman Charles Howard Hartman

    Do 'the most important thing you can do at which you are most difficult to replace' and the technology will take care of itself. Chuck

  • paulcolligan

    I love Chuck.

  • paulcolligan

    And you can do more with your desktop than you can your netbook. It's the question of positioning, etc. in 3 years netbooks as we know them will no exist.

  • Bruce

    I agree with you Paul. Netbooks fit that middle ground as an “on the couch”, “on the go”, easy to fit in my purse/briefcase device. The IPad comes along and offers a much better user experience (better screen) to perform those less serious tasks, such as occasional emails, Facebook, games, lots of apps, etc. As a typical person over the age of 44, I find most netbooks to damn small to read without reading glasses, not so with the IPad. And I would tend to think those under 44 will favor the Ipad anyway.

  • Karlesq

    Hey Paul, thanks for keeping us on the cutting edge. It seems inevitable where the future lies. Time will tell, I am with you on this one.

  • paulcolligan

    Anything to add to the list?

  • paulcolligan

    Once we hit that “smaller” form factor, there are just some things you have to give away. It's kind of like trying to fill your economy car rental with pro basketball players. Sure, you can do it but I'm not quite sure if it makes sense – especially with the options you have these days.

  • http://theRamenNoodle.com/ the Ramen Noodle

    I think another big-name store will be dead in 2010. We've already seen CompUSA and Circuit City go under. Who would be next? I would peg H.H.Gregg over Best Buy, or Staples or Office Max over Office Depot.

  • http://www.businessstrategyconsulting.net Scott Dennison

    I was going to say Blockbuster Stores and others like them, but Ola beat me to it… dead in 2010/11 for sure.

    I'd also take a bit of the action on Internet Guru's being dead – but as you said “not going there”.

    If the reading devices such as Nook, Kindle etal have a big Christmas – I'm thinking one of the big box book stores goes down… (Borders or B&N)

    Bad eating habits (although they die hard (er)) are going away (for me, anyway) along with the excess weight. I figure if Joel Comm can do it – why not everyone…

  • Carson

    Toast for most!

  • paulcolligan

    Interesting. More big box death? Haven't we seen enough?

  • paulcolligan

    O.k., I'll go there. Why are the Internet gurus going away?

  • http://www.guerreroink.com Guerrero Ink

    I use an external travel drive not drobo. LOL The external drives are pretty large come to thing about it.

  • paulcolligan

    there we go